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Introducing Blurb Writing Services for Authors

Blurb Writing Services

I’m so excited to announce that I’m hanging up a shingle for blurb writing services. Writing the blurb—or product description—can be the hardest part of the publication process for authors. I have to admit that I actually enjoy writing blurbs; sometimes I even write them before I’ve written the book!

If you’d like me to help you make your blurb awesome, take a look through my books to get an idea of my style. Then check out my services page for my rates and more details!

You can also email me directly at elizabethbaronebooks@gmail.com.

A Family Tradition

"A Family Tradition," by Elizabeth Barone

I wish there was a way to photograph those moments in life where you truly feel alive, perfect. Capture that feeling, forever preserved. There’s no way to actually save a memory, so I try to remember. I tell myself I’m going to write it down, and then I forget.

There’s a ducky bowl that’s been banging around since I was little. It’s a bit faded at this point, but otherwise in decent condition. When I was a kid, it was the coveted cereal bowl in the house.

I will fight to the death for this. It's a family tradition. 🥄

A post shared by Elizabeth Barone (@elizabethbarone) on

I liked it because when you finished the cereal, the ducky “swam” in the remaining milk. My dad liked it because it was bigger than the other bowls, and the man loves his cereal fixes.

We fought over it, a lighthearted war. It became a race—who would get the clean ducky bowl first. For years this went on, victory cries ringing through the house every time one of us claimed it: “My ducky bowl!”

It became a running joke that, at some point, became a ritual. Ducky bowl was serious business. It traveled with us from apartment to apartment, finally ending up at my grandparents’ when we moved in during my senior year of high school. I poured snacks into it while I wrote my first novel, while I worked on homework during college, while I wrote code for clients’ websites—if Dad didn’t get to it first.

I kept threatening to take it with me when I moved out into my own place. Dad kept threatening to hide it.

I introduced my husband to it like he was meeting family: “This is ducky bowl.” When we got married and began packing to move into our first apartment, I grabbed ducky bowl from the rack of clean dishes and wrapped it in newspaper before Dad could see.

I smuggled ducky bowl out of my parents’ place like a thief.

During that first Christmas after or some other holiday, I confessed my crime to Dad. He feigned wounded outrage, and I tried to make it up to him. “You can have it on weekends,” I offered.

“You can keep it,” he told me, as if passing on a family heirloom.

For the first time in two decades—maybe longer—I had ducky bowl all to myself. Even though I bought a set of dishes with bowls twice as deep, it was still my favorite. I happily munched cereal, marveling at how the thing had managed to stick around. Some things I lose, others hover about me like ghosts.

And then Mike stole it.

“No!” I protested, reaching out for it as Mike poured cereal into it or ate cheesecake out of it. At first I thought he was just messing with me. Slowly I realized I was wrong.

I had a rival.

Again.

The race began anew: secret washing of dishes, stacking it beneath the other bowls in the rack so he wouldn’t see it; playful shock when he got to it first; considering hiding it in an unlikely place. It was these moments that I most missed my dad. (He’s still alive, don’t worry.) I missed the game, the shared running joke. All children grow up and out of their parents’ homes, but I think some small part of us stays behind.

Tonight I caught Mike reaching for ducky bowl in the rack.

“Damn it,” I muttered, feigning offense. I reached for it.

Mike grabbed a spoon. Gently he tapped me on the forehead with it. “Back, demon.”

I gaped at him in mock outrage. My grip tightened.

He tapped me again. “Banish your evil.”

“Unhand it or I’ll bite you.” I leaned down, jaw open, white teeth flashing.

“Banish your evil!” He bopped me on my topknot.

My teeth neared, Mike fending me off with the spoon, my eyes filling with tears of mirth, jaw straining from laughing while pretending to bite. Just as I grazed flesh, he released it, bringing his hand to safety.

“My ducky bowl,” I told him.

He reached for another bowl.

“Here.” I sighed and held out ducky bowl. “You can use it.” For now, I added silently.

Looking at the proffered bowl, he shook his head at me. “Demon.”

I will fight to the death for ducky bowl. It’s a family tradition.

My Autoimmune Disease is Getting on My Nerves… Literally

Photo by Matheus Ferrero on Unsplash

I had a nerve conduction test with my new neurologist yesterday. The test was to see if the numbness, burning, and tingling in my hands is because of carpal tunnel. I was referred by my old rheumatologist.

I liked Dr. Z instantly. She is straight to the point, but really nice. Mike’s been seeing her, so I was already familiar with her and right at ease. Still, I was a bit nervous. Since my old rheumatologist referred me back in April, my symptoms have progressed.

  • the tip of my right index finger has a constant burning sensation
  • the area beneath my thumb on my left palm goes into spasms
  • my feet now get burning and tingling sensations

I had a feeling I wasn’t dealing with carpal tunnel.

During the test, Dr. Z and I chatted about my symptoms, my autoimmune disease, and which doctors I’ve seen. Even though she can seem brisk because she gets right down to things, I found her very warm and personable.

When the test was over, she explained how it worked. Basically, the computer measures how long it takes the electric stimulation to get from Point A to Point B. She showed me the normal ranges and where mine are: normal.

The good news is, she said I don’t have carpal tunnel.

The bad news is, she said it’s likely my autoimmune disease attacking my nerves.

In further good news, Dr. Z said there’s no nerve damage yet. She only tested my hands, and told me that if I’m still having the sensations in my feet in four weeks, to come back. (Since it’s a new symptom, she prefers to wait another month before testing.)

Next week I see my new rheumatologist. I really hope she can put these puzzle pieces together; neither bladder inflammation nor nervous system problems are really a UCTD thing. They’re more of a Lupus thing, and since Dr. S had said my UCTD could be pre-Lupus, I’m a little concerned.

Now that my joint pain is under control and I’m not bedridden or dependent on Mike to help me get dressed, I’d really like to address these other symptoms. I just hope that my new rheumatologist is willing to figure this out with me.

Autoimmune Diseases Suck

Photo by Hailey Kean on Unsplash

One of the things that suck the most about living with an autoimmune disease is the unexplainable symptoms that put your body under siege. Like, for example, feeling like you have a UTI—when you don’t.

It starts out of nowhere. You feel a burning sensation in your bladder. It also feels like you really need to pee. When you go, though, you only urinate a teeny tiny bit. The burning only eases a little.

It happens again and again, so you figure you must have a UTI. You make an appointment with your doctor. They run a urine culture… and it comes back negative. No infection. There’s nothing wrong with you.

But it keeps happening.

Regularly.

And every time, there’s no infection.

None of my doctors have ever been able to explain this to me. I’ve just learned to live with it. I had a tiny flare a few weeks ago, and a few weeks before that. Last night, though, I had a major flare.

For hours, I was miserable. I desperately looked it up, trying to find some kind of remedy. (When you have a UTI, you can get antibiotics from your doctor. So what do you do when you feel like you have a UTI but you don’t?) I found information about interstitial cystitis and Lupus cystitis, both of which have symptoms like what I experience.

“Cystitis” means inflammation in the bladder. Usually it’s caused by bacteria, in which case it’s a UTI.

Because I have UCTD that could be pre-Lupus, I try to note any changes in my “normal.” A few years ago, when I had another bad flare of this weird non-UTI, my doctor at the time found blood and protein in my urine. No one was ever able to explain why to me.

I suspect it’s yet another piece of the puzzle—a puzzle that’s slowly taken shape over the last decade.

I see my new rheumatologist next Thursday. Who knows? Maybe her fresh eyes will help make sense of all this.

In the meantime, I read on Mayo Clinic that taking NSAIDs and an antihistamine could help ease cystitis. It worked like a charm; I still feel dull burning, but it’s way more comfortable than it was.

Autoimmune diseases are so fun. 🙄

An Indefinite Hiatus from Twitter

Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash

Almost a week ago, I decided to take an indefinite hiatus from Twitter. I haven’t looked back since.

For many reasons, I just don’t feel comfortable using Twitter anymore. It’s definitely not the same place it was back when I first joined. And, to be completely honest, I made myself a promise back when I started my career as an author.

I decided that, if any part of this ever stopped feeling good, I’d stop immediately.

Twitter hasn’t felt good for me in a long time. I straight up get nauseous when it’s time to check my timeline or mentions, wondering Now what? Wondering who’s going to be stomping on #OwnVoices authors while demanding more diversity, or who’s going to be telling me I’m not queer enough or disabled enough. Wondering who’s going to wander into my mentions without actually reading my tweets and start ranting at me. I’ve witnessed authors drag other authors or even bloggers and readers, encouraging their thousands of followers to pile on.

If you stand up and say “This isn’t right,” if you don’t instantly block the “trash” people, you’re out, too. Twitter feels like the digital version of high school: “You can’t sit with us, especially if we see you sitting with her.”

I’m almost 29. I am far too old for these kinds of games. I’ve got lots of books I’d rather focus my energy on writing. Not to mention my energy is already lacking, thanks to a current flare.

I’ve tried taking regular Twitter breaks. I’ve tried paring down the number of people I follow. These things helped a little, but they weren’t enough in the long-term.

So I’ve decided I’m done.

I’d already decided to focus my time and money on Facebook. Now that I’ve connected my Facebook page to my reader group, it’s so much easier for me to manage everything. Through research, I know that Facebook is where I need to be if I want to connect with readers. Plus, I’ve made some lasting connections with other authors there.

Authors who are professional and courteous, even when they feel passionately about something.

From here on, my Twitter page will serve as an outpost. I will not be checking mentions or DMs. I have, however, unlocked my account again; I will be tweeting only when I have news to share, and it will usually be an auto-shared link to my blog.

I’m still on Facebook—and have a reader group—as well as Instagram. You can also join my email list.

In the words of the wise Steve Jobs:

Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most importantly, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

It feels so good and quiet now, I can hear myself again.

The First Round of Any Other Love Edits

The first round of edits for Any Other Love are done! I finished the bulk of them around 2 a.m., then left a few things to tidy up after I got some rest. When you read straight through a 70,000-word novel in about five hours flat, your brain starts to melt.

Still, I prefer to do rounds of edits in one sitting. It’s kind of like cramming for a test, except I’m taking the test while binge-studying. All of the details stay fresh in my mind—even with autoimmune brain fog, haha—and I can flip back and forth between comments in the document.

I still have to write a new chapter to add to the beginning of the book. The first draft took for granted that not everyone will have read Just One More Minute. This new chapter will be a sort of second “meet cute” that catches readers up on Am and Char’s history.

I’ve sent the manuscript off to my CP for notes. Meanwhile I’ll be getting back to my work in progress.

Though I’m a little behind schedule, I’m still happy with how things are moving along. Just six weeks left ’til release day!

A Sudden Goodbye

Photo by Ross Findon on Unsplash

Yesterday my father-in-law told Mike that he got a letter saying that our rheumatologist was leaving the practice. I didn’t want it to be true, but I didn’t think my FIL was mistaken. So I called Dr. S’s office.

It’s true.

They couldn’t give me any information. The receptionist I spoke to said she honestly didn’t know. All the staff had been told was that it was personal. It was sudden. I asked about my appointment later this month, and she told me he was already gone.

I’ll be seeing one of the other rheumatologists that day instead.

I’m crushed.

I don’t know how to feel or what to expect from Dr. C. I don’t know if she’ll stick to Dr. S’s treatment plan. If she’ll change my diagnosis. If she’ll even take me seriously. Every time I see a new doctor, I have to start from zero. I have to convince them that, even though my labs are vague, I am legitimately sick.

Every single time.

This couldn’t come at a worse time. I’m dealing with new symptoms, that I thought were carpal tunnel but are now affecting my feet as well as my hands and wrists. There’s a chance that it could be my UCTD developing into Lupus. I need my rheumatologist, who has taken me seriously and worked very closely with me. Not a doctor I’m being shuffled off onto, who now has an even heavier load of patients.

I want to be optimistic. I really do. But it’s hard.

Make a Facebook Page a Group Admin

Photo by William Iven on Unsplash

Recently Facebook started rolling out a new feature: the ability to make a Facebook Page the administrator of a Group. Through this feature, you can now post to your Group as your Page. This eliminates a lot of headache for authors using a pen name. Previously, authors who were using an anonymous pen name or who wanted to separate their personal life from their business had to create a second Facebook account, because you could only post to a group through your personal profile. This was kind of a pain in the ass, though, because then you had multiple accounts to run, plus your author Page(s) and Group(s).

For example, if I’m running a pre-order for my upcoming release, I would:

  • post to my reader Group through my author profile to let my inner tribe know first
  • post to my author Page to let all of my fans know
  • post to my author profile to let all of my author friends and a few readers know
  • post to my personal profile to let close friends and family know

As you can imagine, this gets exhausting—especially if you have a limited supply of energy in the first place. Who has time to deal with all that on top of running a business, writing a new book, and managing a chronic illness?

I saw that a couple friends had been able to make their Pages an admin of their group, and desperately wanted to know how. At the time, though, Facebook was just rolling out this feature and only a percentage of users were getting access. So I continued with my lengthy process—until Facebook released the feature wide and I accidentally stumbled upon it.

I figured I’d share the steps with you so that you can make your life a bit easier, too.

  1. Go to your Facebook author Page. As far as I’m aware, this feature can only be set up while on the desktop/browser version of Facebook (not the mobile or tablet versions).
  2. On the lefthand side, you’ll see your tabs. There is now a Groups tab. Click on that.
  3. There will be a prompt to connect a Group with your Page. You can do this with multiple Groups that you run, by the way. However, I don’t think you can do this with Groups that you’re just a member of. Follow the prompts and Facebook will make your Page an administrator of your Group.
  4. Go to your Group; you can now post as your Page! There will also be an automatic notification to the Group that you’ve made your Page an admin.
  5. When you visit your Page now, there will be a Group widget at the top (much like the Shop widget). Fans of the Page will now see your Group, and members of your Group will be able to see the latest Group post right from your Page.
  6. If you want to rearrange your tabs in the menu, by the way, Facebook has a step-by-step guide. I currently have my Shop tab first, then my Groups.

I’m hoping this new feature will allow for easier growth of my Group. At the very least, it’s cut down on the amount of time it takes for me to manage everything. Now I can deactivate my author account and simplify things a bit!

Was this post helpful? Please let me know by leaving a comment, tipping me via PayPal, or buying one of my novels! 😊

Sign Up for an ARC of Any Other Love

via Unsplash

It’s that time! I’m taking signups for those who would like an Any Other Love ARC. Please read the following carefully, then fill out the form to submit your request. If accepted, you will be notified by email and added to an ARC team email list. I will only contact you regarding Any Other Love, unless you choose to be contacted about future releases.

About Any Other Love

From the outside, Amarie has it all: a promising teaching career, a big group of friends, and a gorgeous boyfriend. On the inside, though, her immune system is attacking her own body and slowly taking away everything she loves. The specialists she’s seen are baffled by her condition, so Amarie takes matters into her own hands and makes an appointment with a renowned rheumatologist in NYC. She could finally get the diagnosis and treatment she needs to live her life—if only she can get there.

Charlotte may dye her hair bold colors, but she’s never been brave enough to chase her lifelong dream of owning her own restaurant. When she finds out about a restauranteur convention in NYC, she’s way too chicken to go for it—until her best friend signs her up. With no excuses left, Char heads out to the city, taking the girl of her dreams with her.

Five nights under the city lights could give Amarie and Char the happily-ever-after they’ve always wanted, but a devastating diagnosis and once-in-a-lifetime opportunity could send it all crashing down.

Any Other Love is a f/f romance.

Available August 21st
Cover Reveal August 7th

Any Other Love ARC FAQs

What is an ARC?

An ARC is an advanced review copy. They’re provided by publishers to get reviews for upcoming releases. Early reviews are important for a few reasons. A new book with zero reviews can be overlooked; reviews—whether 1- or 5-star—are social proof. They show readers that other people have read the book. They also help readers decide whether a book is the right choice for them.

Reviews are important for authors because many advertising services will not accept books with less than 10 reviews. Some require even more!

By posting your honest review, you’re not only helping other readers; you’re also helping authors.

What do I need to do?

All you have to do is read Any Other Love and post your honest review on Amazon on August 21st. I will email you reminders and links for posting.

Your review can be one or two sentences, simply saying whether you liked the book or not. Please be honest! Your review is mainly for other readers.

Note: I’ve heard about other authors who kick readers off their ARC teams for leaving “bad” reviews. This has become a legitimate concern among reviewers, especially when reviewing indie authors’ books. I have not and never would delete a reader for leaving a review that I might perceive as negative.

I do, however, remove readers who constantly request ARCs from me but never actually post reviews. This is an effort to fight piracy (there are people who pose as readers and then put the ebook for sale illegally on other channels). Please contact me if you have any questions.

What is a Kindle email?

Your Kindle email is provided when you set up a Kindle account. I can send your copy of Any Other Love directly to your Kindle device or app if you give me your Kindle email. You must also add @gmail.com to your approved list.

To find your Kindle email, follow these instructions.

To view and edit your approved list, follow these instructions.

Why do I need to provide a link to a review?

As I mentioned above, there are some people posing as readers requesting ARCs who never actually leave a review. Instead, they take the ebook file and sell it on illegal channels. In an effort to cut down on piracy of my books, I’m asking readers who are requesting ARCs to link to a previous review of one of my books.

If you’ve never read one of my books before, please feel free to link to a review of any other book. I’m just looking for legitimacy, so please don’t sweat it. Email me if you have any questions or concerns!

Why are you asking for social media links?

It’s not at all required, but I may ask you to share your review on social media if you’d like. I would then visit your page and share the review to my own social media for marketing purposes. I may also ask if you’d like to participate in the cover reveal, and it’ll be easier if I already have your links. If you don’t feel comfortable sharing them with me, just leave them blank. No worries! I just like being organized and planning ahead.

When will ARCs be sent?

I will be sending out ARCs on or by July 21st. If I send you a Kindle edition, I’ll notify you by email and, I believe, you’ll also receive a notification from Amazon. Regardless, I’ll be keeping you in the loop throughout the next couple of weeks!


Fill out the form below to request an ARC of Any Other Love. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact me.

Summer Flare Makes Me Feel Fine

Photo by Erik-Jan Leusink on Unsplash

I’ve been flaring for just about two weeks now. Yesterday was particularly bad. I ended up calling it a day early and resting on the couch.

I think it has to do with the weather; the temps here have been in the low 70s, getting pretty chilly some nights. It’s been pretty miserable. After so many days of pain, I become convinced that I’ve never had pain-free days and never will again. Pain is smothering like that.

via GIPHY

Still, a few good things happened yesterday:

  • The healthcare bill vote has been delayed because the GOP didn’t have enough support. It’s not dead and bloated, but we blocked that son of a bitch. And we’ll keep blocking it.
  • I crossed 20,000 words for my WIP.
  • I got some potentially good news about a family member.

That’s how I’ve been getting through this flare. Focusing on the good. That and Advil twice a day, Tramadol at night. I haven’t really been sleeping, either, but last night I finally slept decently. Sheer exhaustion? Maybe. But I’d like to think that since my mind was eased a bit, I could burrow through the pain and rest.

I hate summer flares. They don’t happen often. My last was a couple years ago. I really didn’t expect one this summer, since Plaquenil has been working so well for me. Hopefully it’s just a weather thing—maybe we’ll just need to adjust my meds. I see my primary this week and my rheumatologist at the end of the month, so we’ll see.